John Deere Power Systems FAQ

JDPS General Questions

WHO DO I CONTACT FOR PRODUCT INFORMATION?

For engine and drivetrain product information, you may fill out our Contact Us form and we can provide it to you. You may also request product information by calling us at 1-800-533-6446. If you need further assistance, please contact your nearest John Deere Power Systems Distributor.

WHO DO I CONTACT FOR PRICE-RELATED QUESTIONS?

We recommend that you contact your nearest John Deere Power Systems Distributor; they are in the best position to assist you. To locate your nearest distributor, please use our Dealer Locator.

WHO DO I CONTACT FOR TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE?

For technical questions about sales and installation of engines or drivetrain components, please contact your nearest John Deere Power Systems Distributor. For technical questions about service or repair, contact your local John Deere Dealer.

HOW CAN I OBTAIN TECHNICAL INFORMATION (OPERATOR'S MANUALS, PARTS CATALOGS & SERVICE/TECHNICAL MANUALS)?

You may order technical manuals and parts catalogs by calling the Technical Information Bookstore at 1-800-522-7448. Be sure to have the serial number of your engine when you call. Hours are Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Standard Time. They may also be ordered through your local John Deere Dealer or online at Techpubs.Deere.com.

I HAVE A QUESTION REGARDING MY JOHN DEERE LAWN AND GARDEN EQUIPMENT.

Find answers to the most frequently asked questions at the Lawn and Groundscare and Turf Answer Center. Or, call the toll free number for the Consumer Customer Service office at 1-800-537-8233.

I AM A STUDENT. WHO DO I CONTACT FOR RESEARCH INFORMATION?

Visit our About Us website.

HOW DO I BECOME A JOHN DEERE SUPPLIER?

Visit our John Deere Supplier website.

WHO DO I CONTACT ABOUT DONATIONS?

Requests for donations (equipment, funding, materials) are handled on an individual basis. Please discuss the specific details of your request with Cheryl Salley in the Corporate Contribution department: Phone 309-748-7961 or e-mail SalleyCherylA@JohnDeere.com.

Biodiesel

WHAT IS BIODIESEL?

Biodiesel is a renewable, oxygenated fuel made from agricultural resources such as soybeans or rapeseeds. It contains no petroleum but can be blended at any level with petroleum diesel to create a biodiesel blend. Biodiesel refers to the pure alternative fuel before blending with petroleum-based diesel fuel. Biodiesel blends are denoted as "BXX," with "XX" representing the percentage of biodiesel contained in the blend. For example, B20 fuel is a blend of 20 percent biodiesel with 80 percent conventional diesel. B100 is pure biodiesel. In Europe, biodiesel is typically produced from rapeseed oil. In the U.S., it is typically made from soybean oil. Biodiesel also can be made from other new and recycled oilseed crops, animal fats, and grease.

WHAT IS THE JOHN DEERE POSITION ON BIODIESEL USE IN ITS ENGINES?

All John Deere engines can use biodiesel blends. B5 blends are preferred, but concentrations up to 20 percent (B20) can be used providing the biodiesel used in the fuel blend meets the standards set by the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) D6751 or European Standard (EN) 14214.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ASTM D6751 AND EN 14214?

ASTM International is a standards group consisting of technical experts from producers, users, consumers, government, and academia. ASTM standards are commonly recognized in the U.S. and Canada. ASTM D6751 identifies specifications B100 must meet before being blended with petroleum diesel, typically in blends up to B20.

The European Union EN 14214 specification is similar to ASTM D6751 but is somewhat more stringent in some elements of the specification. The other difference is that EN 14214 was developed with B100 in mind, and ASTM D6751 was developed with blends up to B20 in mind.

WHICH JOHN DEERE ENGINES CAN BE USED WITH BIODIESEL?

John Deere engines without exhaust filters can operate on biodiesel blends below and above B20 (up to 100 percent biodiesel); however, they should be operated at levels above B20 ONLY if the biodiesel is permitted by law and meets the EN 14214 specification. Engines operating on biodiesel blends above B20 may not fully comply with or be permitted by all applicable emissions regulations. For these engines, John Deere-approved fuel conditioners containing detergent/dispersant additives are required when using biodiesel blends of B20 or higher, and are recommended when using lower biodiesel blends.

John Deere engines with exhaust filters should not use biodiesel blends above B20. Concentrations above B20 may harm the engine's emissions control system. Specific risks include, but are not limited to, more frequent regeneration, soot accumulation, and increased intervals for ash removal. For these engines, John Deere-approved fuel conditioners containing detergent/dispersant additives are required when using B20, and recommended when using lower biodiesel blends.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF BIODIESEL?

Besides its environmental and energy-security benefits, quality biodiesel results in improved lubricity, minimal sulfur emissions, and reduced aromatics. Biodiesel has a high cetane content for faster ignition. It also produces less visible smoke and lowers the amount of particulate matter, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and life-cycle carbon dioxide emissions produced by an engine.

At 3.2 to 1, biodiesel has an energy balance ratio higher than most alternative fuels. This means a gallon of biodiesel provides users with 3.2 times the energy it takes to produce it.

WHY DOES JOHN DEERE SUPPORT THE USE OF BIOFUELS?

John Deere supports the use of biodiesel because it recognizes the importance of biofuels to its customers and to the environment. The use of biofuels in John Deere diesel engines is the right thing to do from a long-term economic standpoint, as well as environmental, energy-security, and rural-development standpoints.

IS THERE ANY SPECIAL PROTOCOL FOR EQUIPMENT USING BIODIESEL?

Observing best practices is especially important when biodiesel is being used. The following maintenance procedures should be observed with equipment that uses biodiesel:

  • Drain and clean fuel storage tank before and after using biodiesel
  • Install tank caps and covers properly to prevent water from entering
  • Clean any spills on painted surfaces immediately if using B20 or higher blends
  • Replace fuel filter more often initially
  • Check engine oil sump level daily prior to starting the equipment
  • Switch to regular diesel fuel for standby generators, occasional/seasonal applications, and extended periods of storage or idle of the vehicle
  • John Deere-approved fuel conditioners containing detergent/dispersant additives are required when using blends of B20 or greater and are recommended when using lower biodiesel blends.

DO I NEED TO MODIFY ANY SERVICE INTERVALS WHEN SWITCHING FROM PETRODIESEL TO BIODIESEL?

Due to the solvent nature of biodiesel and the potential for "cleaning" of the vehicle fuel tank and lines, new fuel filters should be installed when biodiesel is introduced to older or used engines. For the first two changes, the fuel filter life will be half the standard.

When using biodiesel fuel, the engine oil level must be checked daily. If oil becomes diluted with fuel, shorten oil change intervals.

When using biodiesel blends greater than B20, oil service intervals should be cut in half. In no instance should the fuel dilution of the oil be allowed to exceed 5 percent. OILSCAN™ can be used to verify fuel dilution levels.

Refer to Diesel Engine Oil and Filter Service Intervals for more details regarding biodiesel and engine oil change intervals.

ARE THERE ANY BIODIESEL FUEL STORAGE GUIDELINES?

Biodiesel blends up to B20 should be used within 90 days of the date of biodiesel manufacture. Biodiesel blends from B21 to B100 should be used within 45 days of the date of biodiesel manufacture.

The reason for these usage time periods is to help ensure a stable fuel because biodiesel is naturally biodegradable. In addition to prompt usage, storage tanks should be protected from direct sun, frost, and other extremes. They should also be kept as full as possible to minimize condensation since water accelerates microbial growth. To improve storage and extend fuel life, John Deere recommends the use of a fuel stabilizer. Consult your John Deere dealer for approved biodiesel fuel stabilizers. To be effective, the stabilizer needs to be added when the fuel is fresh (close to the time it is produced).

Request a certificate of analysis from your fuel distributor to ensure that the fuel is compliant with the above specifications.

Testing the fuel to ensure it continues to meet specifications is recommended.

HOW DOES USING BIODIESEL AFFECT THE ENGINE WARRANTY?

The John Deere warranty covers only defects in material and workmanship as manufactured and sold by John Deere. Failures caused by poor quality fuel of any type cannot be compensated under our warranty.

IMPORTANT: Raw pressed vegetable oils are NOT acceptable for use as fuel in any concentration in John Deere engines. Their use could cause engine failure.

ARE THERE ANY DRAWBACKS TO USING BIODIESEL FUEL?

The risk of problems occurring in the engine increases as the level of biodiesel blend increases.

The following must be considered when using biodiesel blends up to B20:

  • Expect a 2 percent reduction in power and a 3 percent reduction in fuel economy when using B20
  • Cold weather flow degradation
  • Stability and storage issues (moisture absorption, oxidation, microbial growth)
  • Possible filter restriction and plugging (usually a problem when first switching to biodiesel on used engines)
  • Possible fuel leakage through seals and hoses
  • Possible reduction of service life of engine components

In addition to those factors listed above, the following must also be considered when using biodiesel blends above B20:

  • Expect up to a 12 percent reduction in power and an 18 percent reduction in fuel economy when using B100
  • Possible coking and/or blocked injector nozzles, resulting in power loss and engine misfire if John Deere-approved fuel conditioners containing detergent/dispersant additives are not used
  • Possible crankcase oil dilution, requiring more frequent oil changes
  • Potential corrosion of fuel injection equipment
  • Possible lacquering and/or seizure of internal components
  • Possible formation of sludge and sediments
  • Possible thermal oxidation of fuel at elevated temperatures
  • Possible elastomer seal and gasket material degradation (primarily an issue with older engines)
  • Possible compatibility issues with other materials (including copper, lead, zinc, tin, brass, and bronze) used in fuel systems and fuel-handling equipment
  • Possible reduction in water separator efficiency
  • Potential high acid levels within fuel system
  • Possible damage to paint if exposed to biodiesel

HOW DOES USING BIODIESEL FUEL AFFECT EMISSIONS CERTIFICATION?

John Deere engines are certified to meet emissions standards with the prescribed EPA and EU registered fuels.

Engines operating on biodiesel blends above B20 may not fully comply with all applicable emissions regulations. It is the customer's responsibility to use the fuel that these regulations require and that the engine manufacturer recommends. In addition, it is also the customer's responsibility to obtain any local, regional, or national exemptions required for the use of biodiesel in any emissions-certified John Deere engine.

IS THERE ANYTHING TO WATCH FOR WHEN PURCHASING BIODIESEL?

Biodiesel users in the U.S. are strongly encouraged to purchase biodiesel blends from a BQ-9000 Certified Marketer and sourced from a BQ-9000 Accredited Producer, as certified by the National Biodiesel Board. Certified Marketers and Accredited Producers can be found at www.bq-9000.org.

WHERE CAN I GET THE JOHN DEERE-APPROVED BIODIESEL FUEL CONDITIONERS?

Consult your John Deere dealer for approved biodiesel fuel conditioners to improve storage and performance with biodiesel fuels.

WHERE CAN I FIND FURTHER INFORMATION AS IT RELATES TO THE USE OF BIODIESEL IN JOHN DEERE ENGINES?

More information about the John Deere position on biodiesel can be found at www.JohnDeere.com/biodiesel.

CAN RAW PRESSED VEGETABLE OILS BE USED IN JOHN DEERE ENGINES?

Recently, there has been increased industry interest in the use of raw pressed vegetable oils as fuel in diesel engines. John Deere continues to investigate many renewable fuels.

Until those studies prove differently, raw pressed vegetable oils are not acceptable for use as fuel in any concentration in John Deere engines. There is concern that use of this fuel could cause engine failure. In addition, engines operating on such fuel may not fully comply with all applicable emissions regulations. It is the customer's responsibility to use the fuel that these regulations require and that the engine manufacturer recommends. In addition, it is also the customer's responsibility to obtain any local, regional, or national exemptions required for the use of fuels in any emissions-certified John Deere engine.

Emissions

WHAT IS MY ENGINE'S YEAR OF MANUFACTURE?

You can now find the build date of your engine under Engine Information Search in our Parts and Service section. If this does not work, you may fill out the Contact Us form, complete with your engine serial number, and we can provide the year of manufacture for you.

WHERE DO I FIND ENGINE EMISSIONS CERTIFICATES?

Visit our Engine Information Search tool in the Parts and Service section of our website.You will need a valid user ID and password to access this site. To request a user ID, click here.

WHAT IS MY ENGINE’S HORSEPOWER RATING?

Please fill out the Contact Us form , and we will provide your engine's horsepower rating.

WHERE DO I FIND CERTIFICATES FOR MY NON-CERTIFIED ENGINE?

We do not have emissions certificates for non-certified engines. However, we do have engine power ratings and emissions data for OEM engines. If you own a non-certified engine and do not know the engine build year, please fill out the Contact Us form, complete with your engine serial number, and we can provide you the information.

Tier 4

WHAT IS THE JOHN DEERE INTEGRATED EMISSIONS CONTROL SYSTEM?

To meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations, John Deere has followed a "building block" approach in which it has systematically adopted technologies to meet each regulatory Tier. Depending upon the power level and engine platform, the John Deere Integrated Emissions Control system encompasses different combinations of aftertreatment and emissions reduction components. John Deere will continue to tailor its Integrated Emissions Control system configurations to fit a variety of off-highway applications. These tailored configurations will provide an optimized solution that delivers emissions compliance without sacrificing power, performance, fluid efficiency, reliability, durability, or economical operating cost.

WHY IS JOHN DEERE IMPLEMENTING SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) FOR FINAL TIER 4/STAGE IV?

Until facing the more stringent NOx emission levels required by Final Tier 4/Stage IV, John Deere has been able to achieve the mandated NOx levels with its cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technology and a single fluid, diesel fuel. With the additional 80 percent reduction in NOx required for Final Tier 4/Stage IV, John Deere will continue to utilize its proven cooled EGR technology but will combine this with SCR technology to achieve the more stringent Final Tier 4/Stage IV NOx emission levels.

IS JOHN DEERE ABANDONING COOLED EGR TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR INTERIM TIER 4/STAGE III B?

John Deere will continue to utilize the field-proven cooled EGR technology developed for Tier 3/Stage III A and Interim Tier 4/Stage III B. For Final Tier 4/Stage IV, the optimization of Integrated Emissions Control system components enables a reduction in cooled EGR flow rates, reducing the amount of heat rejection to the engine coolant. The lower cooled EGR flow rates allow an OEM to work with smaller, lower-cost cooling system components and further improve fuel economy.

HOW IS THE JOHN DEERE SCR SOLUTION DIFFERENT FROM THE SOLUTIONS OF OTHER ENGINE MANUFACTURERS?

John Deere will use a combination of our proven cooled EGR technology and SCR technology to meet the more stringent Final Tier 4/Stage IV NOx emission regulations. The John Deere solution is different because the combination of the two technologies will allow John Deere engines to utilize less diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) than alternative SCR technology solutions. Less consumption of DEF means DEF tanks can be smaller, impact on equipment applications are minimized, DEF filter service intervals can be extended, and operator involvement is reduced.

WHY DOES JOHN DEERE PLAN TO USE AN EXHAUST FILTER (DOC/DPF) FOR FINAL TIER 4/STAGE IV, WHILE SOME COMPETITORS DO NOT?

Some manufacturers have chosen to calibrate their engines to produce less particulate matter (PM) emissions out of the engine, which reduces or eliminates the need for treating PM downstream of the engine. This approach increases engine combustion temperatures and NOx emissions out of the engine, requiring higher levels of diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) to treat the increased NOx downstream of the engine.

John Deere has chosen to utilize cooled EGR and an engine calibration that reduces both engine combustion temperatures and NOx out of the engine. This calibration results in increased PM out of the engine, which is then reduced downstream of the engine with an exhaust filter consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF).

Our optimized Integrated Emissions Control system components reduce the remaining PM and NOx downstream of the engine. This optimization of our Integrated Emissions Control system components allows the engine to deliver the highest level of engine performance and world-class fluid economy while meeting the most stringent emission levels mandated in all regions of the world … today, tomorrow, and into the future.

WILL EXHAUST FILTER REGENERATION INTERVALS REMAIN THE SAME FOR FINAL TIER 4/STAGE IV?

John Deere expects to see longer intervals between exhaust filter regenerations with Final Tier 4/Stage IV. In general, the SCR technology and more efficient fuel delivery systems with Final Tier 4/Stage IV engines will reduce PM out of an engine and, as a result, increase the time between any exhaust filter regeneration.

HOW WILL ENGINE PERFORMANCE BE IMPACTED FOR FINAL TIER 4/STAGE IV?

Engine performance for Final Tier 4/Stage IV will meet or exceed that of Interim Tier 4/Stage III B engines. John Deere engines will continue to provide the same or higher levels of power density and torque along with transient response that meets or exceeds that provided with Interim Tier 4/Stage III B engines.

HOW IS THE DURABILITY OF THE ENGINE IMPACTED BY FINAL TIER 4/STAGE IV TECHNOLOGIES?

For the most part, base engine platforms will not change with Final Tier 4/Stage IV. As a result, our proven durability will continue from Interim Tier 4/Stage II B to Final Tier 4/Stage IV. The new aftertreatment components associated with SCR and Final Tier 4/Stage IV engines are designed to meet the unique needs of off-highway equipment and achieve the same durability goals as our proven Interim Tier 4/Stage III B engines and exhaust filters.

WHAT IS REGENERATION?

The exhaust filter is integrated into the engine design to provide a simple and reliable solution for reducing particulate matter (PM). A single engine control unit (ECU) manages both the engine and exhaust filter, via an exhaust temperature management (ETM) system, to regenerate (clean) the exhaust filter.

If passive regeneration cannot be achieved due to low temperature, load, or speed, then PM is removed using active regeneration — an automatic cleaning process. In most cases, the regeneration process does not have an impact on machine operation or require operator involvement. Another benefit of the exhaust filter is that it replaces the muffler in most applications.

Passive Regeneration

John Deere engines and exhaust filter components are designed for uninterrupted operation using passive regeneration, a natural cleaning process where engine exhaust temperatures are sufficient enough to oxidize the PM trapped in the exhaust filter. The process occurs during normal engine operating conditions, which is the most fuel-efficient way to clean.

Active Regeneration

If conditions (temperature, load, or speed) for passive regeneration cannot be achieved, then PM must be removed using active regeneration, an automatic cleaning process. This requires injecting a small quantity of fuel in the exhaust stream for a short duration and elevating exhaust temperatures to clean the filter. Remember, active regeneration cleaning occurs only when passive regeneration is not possible based on temperature, load, and speed. It serves as a backup system.

Parked/Stationary Regeneration

Parked or stationary regeneration may be necessary if active regeneration is overridden by the operator — or, in rare instances, when the engine does not reach normal operating temperatures because of lighter loads, reduced speeds, or cool ambient conditions for extended periods of time.

HOW DOES EXHAUST TEMPERATURE MANAGEMENT (ETM) WORK?

If conditions (ambient temperature, speed, and load) for passive regeneration cannot be achieved, ETM is an automated engine operating mode used to increase the DOC inlet temperature to initiate and maintain an active regeneration. To increase the DOC inlet temperature, ETM may reduce the amount of fresh air entering the engine via an intake air throttle valve, include a later post injection (after the main injection event), retard engine timing for the main injection event, or vary the Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT) vane position and elevate low idle speed. Once the needed Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) inlet temperature is achieved, a small quantity of fuel is injected into the exhaust stream. This process creates the heat needed to oxidize the PM trapped in the DPF when passive conditions cannot be achieved. In addition, ETM provides an additional benefit of a controlled warm-up and cool-down period, increasing the durability of the exhaust filter.

Performance

DOES A COOLED EGR-EQUIPPED DIESEL ENGINE HAVE A HIGHER INTERNAL COMBUSTION TEMPERATURE THAN AN SCR-EQUIPPED ENGINE?

As its name implies, John Deere cooled EGR technology cools and mixes measured amounts of exhaust gas with incoming fresh air to lower an engine's peak combustion temperature, thereby reducing most engine-out nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. Remaining particulate matter (PM) and NOx emissions are reduced to acceptable levels downstream of the engine using an exhaust filter and an SCR catalyst, respectively. The exhaust filter traps and oxidizes PM while low levels of diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) injected into the exhaust stream ahead of the SCR catalyst reduce NOx emissions to an acceptable level.

In contrast, engines equipped with only the SCR technology utilize an engine calibration that operates at higher combustion temperatures in order to reduce PM to acceptable emissions levels within the engine. This places additional heat on internal components of the engine and creates more engine-out NOx. To reduce these higher levels of NOx downstream of an engine, larger amounts of DEF are injected into the exhaust stream and combine with the exhaust gases in the SCR catalyst to reduce NOx emissions to an acceptable level. John Deere cooled EGR engines actually have cooler internal engine combustion temperatures than SCR-only engines. Cooled EGR engines do place more cooling requirements (higher heat rejection) on the cooling system. However, John Deere has adopted new cooling system designs and variable speed fan drives that meet these cooling needs in the most efficient method possible. With the addition of SCR for Final Tier 4/Stage IV, optimized John Deere Final Tier 4 engine calibrations will utilize lower cooled EGR flow rates than Interim Tier 4/Stage III B, reducing the engine's heat rejection. The optimized John Deere Integrated Emissions Control system approach for Final Tier 4/Stage IV enables cooler engine combustion temperatures. The Integrated Emissions Control system of cooled EGR, an exhaust filter, and SCR results in higher power density, higher peak torque values, improved levels of engine durability, lower diesel fuel consumption, and the lowest DEF consumption. The net result is world-class total fluid economy.

HOW DOES THE POWERTECH PWL 4.5L ENGINE REDUCE PM WITH AN INTEGRATED EMISSIONS CONTROL SYSTEM CONSISTING OF A DOC AND SCR

Through extensive combustion optimization and aftertreatment development, John Deere achieved levels of PM emissions reduction and performance in the 56 to 104 kW (75 to 140 hp) power range that enabled removal of the DPF for Final Tier 4/Stage IV.

The development of a new combustion system, associated changes in engine calibration, and the optimized Integrated Emissions Control system allow the PowerTech PWL 4.5L engine to achieve engine-out PM levels near zero. Any remaining PM is then oxidized passively in the DOC without the need for regeneration.

With the no-DPF Final Tier 4/Stage IV emissions technology solution, the PowerTech PWL 4.5L engine achieves customer performance expectations, improves engine packaging, and reduces cost.

Fluid Economy/DEF

WHAT IS THE EXPECTED FLUID ECONOMY FOR JOHN DEERE FINAL TIER 4/STAGE IV ENGINES?

The total fluid economy (diesel fuel and DEF) with Final Tier 4/Stage IV engines is expected to meet or exceed that of our proven Interim Tier 4/Stage III B engines with cooled EGR and exhaust filters operating on diesel fuel only. When you consider that our Interim Tier 4/Stage III B engines have been tested in many applications globally and have established the benchmark for fluid economy, we are confident that John Deere Final Tier 4/Stage IV engines will continue to provide world-class fuel economy while delivering improved performance and higher machine productivity.

HOW MUCH DEF WILL BE CONSUMED WITH JOHN DEERE FINAL TIER 4/STAGE IV ENGINES?

DEF consumption will be 1 to 3 percent of diesel fuel consumption depending on the application.

HOW IS JOHN DEERE DEALING WITH THE POTENTIAL FOR UREA FREEZING IN COLD ENVIRONMENTS?

DEF is made of 32.5 percent urea and 67.5 percent deionized water and will begin to gel at 12° F (-11° C). From an engine perspective, there will be heated DEF lines between the DEF tank and the decomposition tube where DEF is injected into the exhaust stream. When the engine is shut down, DEF is pumped out of all lines and the supply is pumped back into the DEF tank. The DEF tank itself is equipped with a heating element that utilizes engine coolant to thaw DEF in temperatures below 12° F (-11° C). The engine can be operated immediately and throughout the DEF tank thawing process.

HOW OFTEN WILL USERS NEED TO FILL TANKS WITH DEF?

DEF consumption varies depending on DEF tank size, engine load, and speed. Typically, the DEF tank should be checked and filled as part of routine service checks.

Service Requirements

WHAT ARE THE ADDITIONAL SERVICE REQUIREMENTS FOR FINAL TIER 4/STAGE IV?

For the most part, the service requirements for Final Tier 4/Stage IV mirror the service requirements of Interim Tier 4/Stage III B engines. One additional service requirement for Final Tier 4/Stage IV will be the replacement of a small DEF filter that can be easily changed during other routine engine service.

WILL THERE BE A CHANGE IN OIL OR FUEL REQUIREMENTS FOR FINAL TIER 4/STAGE IV?

There will be no change in oil or fuel requirements for Final Tier 4/Stage IV. Owners and operators should use only ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel with a maximum of 15 mg/kg (15 ppm) sulfur content and engine oils meeting API Service Category CJ-4, ACEA Oil Sequence E9, or ACEA Oil Sequence E6. Oil change intervals of 250 or 500 hours will also remain unchanged for Final Tier 4/Stage IV.