An aerial view of John Deere World Headquarters

World Headquarters

A man's image is reflected in the glass of a wall mural

Past to Present

Deere & Company World Headquarters is located in Moline, IL. Stroll through history with our three-dimensional timeline mural, "Reflections of an Era."

John Deere World Headquarters is open daily and free to the public.

Reflections of an Era: Three-Dimensional Historic Mural

180 foot-long, three-dimensional mural tracing the history of John Deere, with 2,200 pieces of authentic memorabilia.

   

Three people look up at a John Deere combine on the display floor

Display Floor

Whether you're interested in buying John Deere equipment or just a fan, the display floor is for you. Get in the cab of some of our biggest machines and get a picture of yourself behind the wheel. Or simply use your time to learn about John Deere's products and innovation.

   

   

Reflections of an Era: Three-Dimensional Historic Mural

180 foot-long, three dimensional mural tracing the history of John Deere, with 2,200 pieces of authentic memorabilia.

Three dimensional historic mural

   

Award-Winning Building

In the mid-1950s, Deere & Company President William Hewitt was getting pressure to move the company's headquarters from Moline, Illinois, to New York or San Francisco. Hewitt resisted the idea. But, he agreed that if the company were to remain in Moline, it needed a distinctive new building for its head office. So he set out to find an innovative architect to make it happen. He found Eero Saarinen, who also designed the Gateway Arch in St. Louis.

Hewitt emphasized that, while he wanted a headquarters that was unique, it must reflect the character of the company and its employees.

Saarinen accomplished that and more. In fact, the Deere & Company World Headquarters has won a number of architectural awards, including:

Twenty-Five Year Award, 1993
American Institute of Architects

First Honor Award, 1965
American Institute of Architects

Architectural Award of Excellence, 1965
American Institute of Steel Construction

Silver Medal of Honor, 1965
The Architectural League of New York

Collaborative Medal of Honor, 1965
The Architectural League of New York

"Office of the Year," 1964
Silver Plaque Award Administrative Management Magazine

National "Plant America" Award, 1964
American Association of Nurseryman

   

The several buildings should be thoroughly modern in concept but should not give the effect of being especially sophisticated or glossy. Instead, they should be more 'down-to-earth' and rugged ...

William Hewitt
Deere & Company Chairman, mid-1950s