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175th Anniversary

Our roots go back to 1837 and John Deere's one-man blacksmith shop. We're proud of this heritage and are excited about a future full of opportunities to help meet the world's growing need for food, shelter, and infrastructure.
 

We're celebrating all of this in 2012, our 175th anniversary, and we hope you'll join in.


Markers Detail John Deere's Early Life


A historical marker commemorating John Deere's birthplace was unveiled in Rutland, Vermont, on July 18. The 10-foot-tall permanent marker is in the city’s John Deere Birth Place MarkerMain Street Park, near the spot where Deere was born.


Middlebury, Vermont, about 30 miles north of Rutland, installed a similar sign in 1968.

Deere's family moved to Middlebury in 1805 when he was a year old. He spent his childhood there and later learned his trade as an apprentice to one of the town’s blacksmiths.


Deere's Long-Time Connection to Golf


Deere was an early supplier to golf course owners, offering a special rubber-tired version of the "GPO" in the 1920s (seen here), but by then the company and its Deere's Long-Time Connection to Golfemployees were already a part of the game's history.

 

Jack Cady, John Deere's grandson, and Burton Peek, fifth president of Deere & Company, helped organize a golf club in Rock Island, Illinois, in 1897, just as the sport was being established in the United States.


Later, Cady won a silver medal as part of the U.S. golf team at the 1904 Summer Olympics.


Today, along with serving as the sponsor of the John Deere Classic, the company is the Official Golf Course Equipment Supplier, Landscape Product Supplier and Golf Course Equipment Leasing Company of the PGA TOUR.


John Deere in Russia

In 1909 a John Deere representative visited Russia and reported that possibilities there were "so vast as to demand serious thought, even in the face of serious difficulties."

John Deere in RussiaDeere made its first sale in Russia the next year, when 900 plows were delivered to Vladivostock. By 1923, Russian farmers were using John Deere Waterloo Boy tractors. Over the next seven years Deere shipped plows, disk tillers, and 4,000 of its brand-new Model "D" Tractors to the region. In 1930, Deere's Russia business accounted for nearly 10% of the company's sales.

Today, Russia is home to two Deere production facilities and a number of sales, marketing, and parts-distribution locations.  Pictured here are Waterloo Boy Model "N" tractors working in a Russian field in 1932.

175th Facebook App

175th Annivesary on Facebook

Thanks to all who participated in our 175th campaign on Facebook!

Enjoy the shared memories in our 175 Years of Fans' Memories photo album
175 Anniversary

John Deere's Promise

"I will never put my name on a product that does not have in it the best that is in me."

Watch our celebration of 175 years of a promise kept.

GET YOUR 175TH ANNIVERSARY GEAR

175TH ANNIVERSARY GEAR

Celebrate in style, check out our limited edition clothing and apparel

Visit John Deere Gifts now.

John Deere 175th Wallpapers

175th Wallpapers

Take a look at John Deere's past and present product history

Download your favorite 175th John Deere wallpaper.

Please note that all information, plans, policies related to product, warranty, services and support available in this website will be subjected to specific review of your country for applicability.  Please contact John Deere authorized dealer for detailed information.