Power Sweeper Success Rooted in Simplicity

Broce Manufacturing’s New RJT-350 Power Sweeper with Final Tier 4/Stage IV Industrial Engine

Broce Manufacturing's success story began in 1963 when Ray C. Broce, a highway contractor, manufactured the first self-propelled power sweeper. Fifty-five years and some 15,000 machines later, the Oklahoma City manufacturer sweeps the world over with its mid-mount, self-propelled industrial brooms.

"There's beauty in keeping your product line simple," said Terry Wimer, vice president of sales and marketing. "We've made improvements over the years, but sticking to one model simplifies production and gives us better control over quality."

After moving through each stage of emissions standards with John Deere engines, Broce recently went into production of the RJT-350 power sweeper with Final Tier 4/Stage IV industrial engines. A 74-hp PowerTech™ EWX 4.5L industrial engine powers the current model.

Working closely with an experienced partner like John Deere made the transition seamless. "You'd think something this dramatic would cause more ripples than it did. The credit goes to John Deere for having their ducks in a row and having good people to iron out the details," said Wimer.

Broce Manufacturing worked closely with their John Deere engine distributor, Industrial-Irrigation, during this transition. They even shipped an RJT-350 power sweeper to the distributor's facility in Hastings, Nebraska, to ensure a smooth integration.

In fact, even though the Final Tier 4 engine is bigger than the one Broce Broom was using before, the team didn't have to make any adjustments to its frame design.

Regardless of which emissions tier they're in, Broce Broom ensures its power sweepers deliver on what its customers want most - durability and dependability. "It's a harsh and difficult environment," said Wimer. "At the end of the day, a guy wants to do the job, and that's the priority. In my opinion, it's the performance of the engine that's key."

Perhaps that's why Broce Broom has powered its industrial brooms with John Deere since 1983. "John Deere engines have held up very well," said Wimer. "If it is cared for properly, we have no engine problems."

You’d think something this dramatic would cause more ripples than it did. The credit goes to John Deere for having their ducks in a row and having good people to iron out the details.

Terry Wimer
Vice president of sales and marketing, Broce Manufacturing